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10 Most Iconic Batsuits

The Dark Knight has his fair share of Batsuits. From the most odd and strange iterations to some of the most badass we have ever seen throughout comics, cartoons, movies and games. For this list we will be taking a look at ten of the most iconic batsuits throughout Batman’s history. Understandably, we know there are so many suits that we are missing for this list. But we will leave an honorable mentions list at the bottom of the article. However, these will be the most recognizable and iconic suits the Dark Knight has worn. Unfortunately some of the crazier and over the top suits like the Zebra and Rainbow Batman will not be included.

Also Read: 10 Batsuits We Want in the Next Arkham Game

Flashpoint

First Appearance (Comics): Flashpoint #1 (2011)

Worn by Thomas Wayne in the Flashpoint storyline. The Flash goes back in time to save his mother from her demise, causing a ripple effect and flipping the DC Universe on its head. The change includes Bruce Wayne dying at the hands of the attacker as a child, leaving Martha and Thomas Wayne still alive. Thomas doesn’t go through the same intensive training Bruce does to become Batman, instead he relies on brute force and weapons to make it as a vigilante.

 

1989

First Appearance (Film): Batman (1989)

Featured in both the 89’ film and its sequel Batman Returns and worn by Michael Keaton in both movies. This batsuit answers Christian Bales question in Batman Begins “Does it come in Black?” with this dark armored batsuit. While he may struggle to turn his head in this suit, it was the first dark iteration in a live-action film audiences had seen. Since the last time we saw a live-action Batman was with Adam West’s version.

 

Animated Series

First Appearance (Television): Batman The Animated Series, Season 1, Episode 1 (1992)

If you don’t consider the 89’ suit as the career altering outfit for the Dark Knight, then this one most likely change your mind. Etched by Bruce Timm and Paul Dini for their animated series, this version of Batman was drawn on black paper for the show and features a blue sheen cape and cowl with grey tights and yellow oval under the chest logo. Timm and Dini’s artistic choice with this design is what makes this suit so memorable.

 

Hush

First Appearance (Comics): Batman (vol.1) #603 (2003)

Crafted by Jim Lee for one of the most iconic Batman stories put to comics. Featuring similarities to the animated series version, this batsuit is also a cloth based outfit with navy blue cape and cowl with a grey tights. Instead of a yellow oval on the chest, it features a large bat across the front. Whether it is the design of the suit or maybe the way Jim Lee draws it, it is one of the most recognizable batsuits in comics.

 

Beyond

First Appearance (Televison): Batman Beyond, Season 1, Episode 1 (1999)

Crafted by the creators of the DC Animated Universe, the Beyond suit is not worn by Bruce Wayne but Terry McGinnis instead. First appearing in the animated show, this suit was unlike anything we had seen previously. Featuring a simple black and red color scheme with no cape, longer ears and packed with all kinds of new technology. The suit has become so iconic that is has been featured in current Batman media such as the comic books and an original design in the video game Batman: Arkham Knight.

 

Blue and Grey

First Appearance (Comics): Detective Comics (vol.1) #394 (1969)

Drawn by Neal Adams, the Blue and Grey design was first featured in 1969 but continued through the 70’s and became another character altering moment for the character. Also referenced to as the 1970’s suit, this batsuit has been the benchmark for future redesigns of the character. Using this suit as reference for others like the Animated Series and Hush costumes mentioned earlier on the list.

 

Rebirth

First Appearance (Comics): DC Universe: Rebirth #1 (2016)

One of the most recent outfits on our list, this iteration took everything we love about Batman’s various suits and put it all together for this one. Sporting a purple cape interior, short ears, and yellow lining around the chest logo. An upgrade from the New 52 design, this look was more of a celebration of the Dark Knight rather than a completely new look for him.

 

Ben Affleck

First Appearance (Film): Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016)

Although this design is a variation of Frank Millers look from his 1986 comic The Dark Knight Returns, this suit once again features short ears, but also has a thick logo on the chest with a black and grey color scheme. While most of the love from this suit comes from its resemblance to Frank Miller’s, it is still a bulky and bold look for the Dark Knight that increases its intimidation factor.

 

Original

First Appearance (Comics) : Detective Comics (vol.1) #27 (1939)

Nothing beats the original. Thankfully, Bill Finger didn’t allow Bob Kane to proceed with the red tights and large winged design he originally made. Instead, Finger redesigned Batman to feature the long ears, cape, purple gloves, black and grey get-up and mask that fully covers his face. Without this design, Batman wouldn’t be the Dark Knight that he is today. Giving space for other artists to create their own iterations after this first appearance look.

 

Arkham City

First Appearance (Video Game): Batman: Arkham City (2011)

While we love the Arkham Knight look, this is the one that defined the Arkham Series and was the perfected upgrade of the suit from Arkham Asylum. Perhaps we might be over exaggerating, since this look is still so similar to the one from Arkham Asylum. This iteration featured a better look for the chest logo and didn’t feel as big and bulky as it did before. Creating a sense of realism for players when they were flying across the screen taking down enemies.

Also Read: Every Theatrical Batmobile Ranked Worst to Best

If you think we missed some Batsuits, let us know. These are our Honorable Mentions: The Dark Knight Trilogy, Azrael, Adam West and New 52.

Written by David Moya

A lot of appreciation for Marvel. Big love for DC Comics!

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