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35 Details That Prove Disney Puts Their Hearts and Souls Into What They Do

We have all probably lost count of the number of times we’ve watched Disney classics like The Lion King, Aladdin, and The Little Mermaid. These films symbolize our childhood. Infact our childhood is firmly rooted in such Disney classics.

The team of geniuses that works for these iconic Disney movies pays great attention to little details, plot twists, and characters.

But we have Disney detectives who leave no stone unturned. From Easter eggs to incredible hints, tiny details, and scenes, they fish everything out and bring it into plain sight. Often, their findings change and add depth to the perspective of the whole film. Take a moment to appreciate and scroll down to see what you may have missed out on despite so many watches.

In Disney’s Mulan (1998) – Mulan is told “A girl can bring her family great honor in one way…by striking a good match.” The two times Mulan claimed victory over the Huns was with the help of lighting explosives.

The directors of Aladdin (1992) wrote the part of the Genie specifically for Robin Williams. As a tribute, at the end of the movie, the Genie appears in the same yellow Hawaiian shirt and Goofy hat that Robin Williams wore in Disney’s short film Back to Neverland (1989)

In the Incredibles (2004) a short cameo of Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston features. These are the same legendary Disney animators who worked on Disney’s first-ever animated film, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)

Moana writers play a joke on The Rock’s nickname when a villager foreshadows the chicken’s unsuccessful attempt to consume Maui.

In Aladdin, the genie sings, “Well, Ali Baba had them forty thieves, Scheherazade had a thousand tales.” But Scheherazade had 1001 Arabian tales and Aladdin was one of them.

In the opening credits of Toy Story 2, the stars were compiled together in the shape of the Pixar lamp.

17 Cartoon Details That Prove Moviemakers Put Their Hearts and Souls Into What They Do

The character of Chicha from The Emperor’s New Groove (2000) was the first pregnant female character to appear in a Disney animated feature film. She’s also one of the first mother characters in a Disney film not to be killed off or villainized.

The hook never leaves Maui. Whenever he changes into an animal on Moana, the hook shows up somewhere on his body.

At the end of Frozen, Disney included a statement about Kristoff’s belief that all men eat their own boogers.

In Disney’s The Lion King, the line “What do you want me to do? Dress in drag and do the hula?” was totally improvised by Nathan Lane who voices Timon’s voice. The director liked the line so much, he decided to get it animated and make a scene out of it.

Lions tend to retract/extend their claws as needed. However, in The Lion King, Scar’s claws are always out signifying he was always prepared.

In Disney’s Princess and The Frog (2009), Tiana’s dad received the DSC (Distinguished Service Cross)—the US Army’s second-highest award for valor. During WWI African-American soldiers often did not receive America’s highest recognition for bravery—the Medal of Honor.

When Aladdin gave an order to Genie, he wrote it from right to left. That is exactly how Arabic is typically written.

In The Princess and The Frog, the shadow of Dr. Facilier turned into skulls and crossbones on the wallpaper.

At the end of Disney/Pixar’s Ratatouille (2007) Anton Ego appears to have become a bit healthier. This is especially touching since he states, “I don’t like food, I love it… if I don’t love it I don’t swallow.”

In Disney’s Tangled, Mother Gothel kisses Rapunzel’s hair instead of her forehead. Reason being that Rapunzel’s hair is the source of her youth.

In Disney’s Hercules (1997) the Fates tell Hades “In 18 years precisely the planets will align ever so nicely”, but only show 6 planets. The Greeks were only aware of 5 planets (plus Earth) which they could see with the naked eye.

If you look closely, in Zootopia, Nick first answers “yes” when he’s questioned on the paper if he’s ever been arrested, and then scribbles over it.

In Disney’s Cinderella and Alice In Wonderland, Verna Feltons voiced the Fairy Godmother and the Red Queen in both the original animations. History repeated itself when in the live-action remake of both the classics, Helena B. Carter played both the characters.

In Saving Mr. Banks (2013), you can see the special Oscar on top of the shelf that Walt Disney won for Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.

In Disney’s The Rescuers (1977), When Orville the Albatross wanted to fly, he required a runway and had to sprint before taking flight. Albatrosses in real life too require a running start due to their significant size and weight.

In Disney’s Pinocchio (1940), Figaro has a little “sandbox” placed next to his bed that is only visible in one shot. Home cats have a litter box for the purpose of taking a dump. That’s some serious detail!

In The Jungle Book (1967) the original plan was for the Beatles to voice the four vultures who befriend Mowgli when he feels betrayed by Baloo. But the Fab Four’s schedule didn’t leave time for recording their lines and John Lennon was opposed to the whole idea as well. The vultures still bear some physical and vocal resemblance to the famed British band, though their song, ‘That’s What Friends Are For,’ is more barbershop than British Invasion.

In the beginning of Pinocchio, (1940) Jiminy Cricket opens a book to tell the story of Pinocchio. Two  books titled Alice in Wonderland and Peter Pan were placed behind on the shelf which later went on to get their own animated feature film.

In Zootopia, the handkerchief which Nick used was a part of his Scout uniform from when he was a cub.

In The Princess and the Frog, when Tiana goes out in search for her second job, An old lady can be seen shaking the Magic Carpet from Aladin in the backgorund which she seemed to have been using in her house as a rug.

If you zoom in and see, the adoption paper Nani signs in Lilo & Stitch (2002) Stitch’s actually a thank you letter from the directors and producer to the people who helped create the film.

In Tangled, the lantern that Rapunzel lofts back into the sky is the one lit by the queen and king (her true parents). It was the only one with the royal symbol of the sun on it.

Zootopia makers cleverly play a pun of ‘a buck on a buck’

In an attempt to save his Old English Sheep Dog who is still on the boat, the prince, Eric ends up drowning and is saved by Ariel who sings sings to him. When he opens his eyes, Ariel is backlit making her hair appear dark brown/black. It makes it even more conceivable that Eric believes the dark-haired human version of Ursula was the one woman that rescued him.

In Hercules (1997) when Hercules first walks into Phil’s cabin he hits his head on the mast of the Argo. In the original myth, Jason, the captain of the Argo, was killed when the mast hit his head.

In The Lion King, (1994) Nala used her anti-pounce maneuver on Simba as a cub and a grown lioness.Simba makes a good use of this maneuver when he fights with Scar.

In Lilo & Stitch (2002) Lilo believes Pudge the fish controls the weather. Her parents were killed in a car accident caused by treacherous rain and she feeds him sandwiches to appease him, in hopes another accident will not happen like the one that took her parents.

In Mulan (1998), Mulan mentions ‘Punctual’ as one of the desirable qualities in a bride. This is a callback to Aladdin when the Genie accidentally tells him to say ‘Punctual’.

When Disney created the blu-ray version of Cinderella (1950) they made it so scrubbed of grain that it removed some of the linework off from Cinderella’s dress.

Did you notice any of these on your last re-watch? Tell us in the comment section below!

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Source: BoredPanda

Written by Muneer