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Batman’s Smartest Robin Reveals Why He Hesitated To Come Out As Bisexual

Tim Drake, also known as the third Robin, officially came out as bisexual in Batman: Urban Legends #6. Read on to find out why it took him years to confess.

Robin Finally Realizes He’s Queer

Tim Drake aka Robin
Tim Drake in Batman: Urban Legends

It was a lightbulb moment for Robin to finally realize who he is and accept his sexuality. In his comic panel, he said:

Like something out in the ether has been taunting you, teasing you. Like you know you’re supposed to be on the same page as your brain, but not everything made sense. People keep asking me what I want. But I couldn’t grasp it. Whatever it was. It always felt just out of reach.

Clearly, the young lad is troubled with uncertain feelings. When he caught up with his friend, Bernard Dowd, he admitted thinking about the other night they fought together. Bernard, then, asked Tim for a date, which the latter agreed to.

Tim Drake Robin Bernard Dowd
Batman: Urban Legends Tim Drake and Bernard Dowd

Meghan Fitzman, the comics writer, said in an interview with Polygon that the team is not putting any label on Robin’s emotions and that the idea of sexuality is a journey and not a defined destination. He is still figuring himself out, and he does not possess the language to articulate all of it yet.

Why It Took Him So Long To Realize

Batman Urban Legends Robin Bernard
Tim Drake and Bernard Dowd

DC Comics never wanted to make Robin queer, but the comics writers seemed to find a way to slowly incorporate the idea. Back in 1954, a psychiatrist named Frederic Wertham wrote a book, Seduction of the Innocent, and targeted that comic books are influencing the minds of children. Even Batman and Robin’s relationship was called out as “a wish dream of two homosexuals living together.”

With Robin becoming canonically queer, DC Comics has decided to turn it into a positive association. It is now something that the young hero needs to embrace. The comics community has been making an effort to be inclusive of everyone, regardless of gender and sexuality.

Written by Ariane Cruz

Content writer at FandomWire.