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“If he didn’t die that night, it’s his legacy”: The Sopranos Writer Stirs Debate Yet Again on Show’s Divisive Finale as Fans Still Ponder About Tony Soprano’s Fate After 15 Years

The Sopranos Writer Stirs Debate Yet Again on Show’s Divisive Finale as Fans Still Ponder About Tony Soprano’s Fate

HBO hit show, The Sopranos has redefined the modern ethos of television culture since 1999 and seems to constantly repopulate the trope of mafia crime drama in film and series. However, the David Chase creation that has made history in its explosive debut and 6 seasons stay at the premiere network, still leaves one major question unanswered in its finality.

Tony Soprano, the mob boss who has reigned the screens for 8 years was massively wronged at the show’s end when Chase left the series open-ended with the lead’s fate hanging in the balance, giving a new definition to the term: Schrödinger’s cat.

The Sopranos
Tony Soprano

Also read: “I can’t say what it’s about”: The Sopranos Star Michael Imperioli Teases More Expansion After The Many Saints of Newark With Creator David Chase

The Sopranos Writer Reignites Debate About Show’s Finale

Whenever asked about it in direct terms, David Chase had veered ambiguously away from answering his own character’s end, while the show’s long-term writer and producer, Terence Winter has time and again sparked debate regarding the open-ended finale. Recently, the debate resurged in the popular culture crowd once again after Winter addresses the issue in a more exclusively worded reply than ever before:

“I always thought that if he didn’t die that night, certainly, that’s kind of his legacy. At some point in this guy’s life, somebody’s going to come out of a bathroom or a doorway, and it’s going to be over. That’s the message that I took away. When you live that life, and when you’re Tony Soprano, even going out for ice cream with your family is fraught with danger. You’re always looking over your shoulder, you’re always suspicious of people. “Who’s that guy? Why is that guy looking at me?” It’s that self-imposed hell that he created for himself because of his life.”

Terence Winter addresses The Sopranos finale
Terence Winter addresses The Sopranos finale

Also read: TV Shows That Had Ambiguous Endings Like The Sopranos

David Chase has never singularly confirmed the fate of Tony Soprano but he has always added fuel to the already raging fire by continuously encouraging both sides of the debate. Terence Winter’s reply does put to rest the long-held speculations regarding the fate of the late James Gandolfini‘s legacy. But even then, Chase’s clashing rhetoric keeps hope alive, in some part, that perhaps the Soprano chief may have finally found a way out of his predicament and is currently munching on some gabagool in one of his numerous robes while watching wild ducks paddling away in his swimming pool.

Tony Soprano Redefines the Schrödinger’s Cat Situation

Ever since the series ended, the infuriated, frustrated, and hopeless fandom has been left to their own devices to search for the answers to the show’s finale. Each resigned to their own version of closure, some believing the more probable pessimistic outcome, while others assumed anything could happen in the world of television, specifically when it comes to the glorious New Jersey mafia and its patriarch — Tony Soprano.

Tony Soprano
Tony Soprano’s fate remains open to debate

Also read: 15 Classic TV Shows That Almost Had A Completely Different Ending

Armed with Terence Winter’s new iteration of The Sopranos finale, the crowd amasses their wealth of insider mob know-how and their Sopranos dictionaries to set out in search of a newfound resolution to the HBO show’s ending. But in the meantime, Tony Soprano remains neither dead nor alive and will continue to stay as such until The Sopranos universe decidedly opens up that box of probabilities and directly addresses the situation in its finality.

Source: MovieMaker

Written by Diya Majumdar

At 25, Diya Majumdar is inching closer to getting to the bottom of every film and television's history in existence. Having graduated with honors in literature from Miranda House, DU, her passion and profession both include dissecting the world of cinema, with almost 500 published articles on Fandomwire. She is a liberally opinionated person with an overbearing love for Monet, Edvard Munch, and Van Gogh and boasts of being an avid painter of all their troubled works. If she’s not writing or painting, Diya can often be found in tattoo parlors across Delhi or on rooftops at 3 am listening to music.