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“I’ve a baby, I want to move on”- Amber Heard Breaks Down Crying During The Trial

After a pre-planned break, the defamation trial of Amber Heard and Johnny Depp resumed on May 17, with Amber Heard on the witness stand giving her testimony. Before the trial went on break, she was describing disturbing allegations of domestic violence.

Amber Heard
Amber Heard during the cross-examination in the trial

On Monday, Heard gave her testimony by clarifying her intentions in writing an op-ed she wrote for The Washington Post in 2018 in which she briefed surviving domestic violence without mentioning Johnny Depp by his name.

Amber Heard Breaks Down During The Trial

Amber Heard
Johnny Depp’s lawyers cross-examine Amber Heard in defamation trial

As Heard’s testimony ended, the cross-examination of Heard started by Johnny Depp’s legal team took somewhat an emotional turn for Heard.

Just after Heard’s attorneys were done with their questions, they asked her to speak about the emotional impact that affected her. Earlier, Depp’s former attorney accused Heard that she lied about being abused.

Amber Heard replied, “It’s torture. It’s torturous, No one should have to do that. I want to move on with my life.”

She went on to state that she wants to move on with everything and she hopes Depp to do the same. “I have a baby. I want to move on. … I want Johnny to move on, too. I want him to leave me alone.”

Heard told that she is forced to recall the “painful memories” because of the allegations she faces about abuse every day.

Embarrassing, intimate details that I never wanted to be known, never wanted to be public ever, and to have them used every single day to call me a liar,” Heard said. “I have to relive this every single day that I have to address those claims.”

Amber Heard Explained Her Intention to Writing OP-ED in 2018

Amber Heard reveals her intentions behind the op-ed
Amber Heard reveals her intentions behind the op-ed

Pirates of the Caribbean star Johnny Depp sued his ex-wife Amber Heard for defamation after she wrote an op-ed for The Washington Post without mentioning Depp by his name referring to herself as a “public figure representing domestic abuse.”

In the recent hearing of the trial, she told the court by saying that the first draft was written by the staff of the American Civil Liberties Union for whom she had started work as an ambassador. She said she was happy to lend her voice to the debate over domestic violence and wasn’t intending to reference Depp.

Written by Priya Sharma