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Netflix Reportedly Working on US Version of Squid Game, Fans Suspect Another Diluted Whitewashed Remake Like ‘Death Note’

Netflix Reportedly Working on US Version of Squid Game, Fans Suspect Another Diluted Whitewashed Remake Like 'Death Note'

Apparently, Squid Game is getting a remake in the US and the fans are not happy about it. The Korean show recently catapulted to a global fascination and the phenomenon that was launched in the aftermath was bound to be picked up by Hollywood in the near future. According to the ongoing rumors, The Ankler’s Jeff Sneider has good reason to believe that the home streamer to the highly violent and sensational series will adapt it into an English language remake, making room for a broader demography and a wider fanbase.

Squid Game
Squid Game

Also read: Why Did Each Main Character Return to Play Squid Game?

Is Squid Game Being Adapted Into a Remake in the US?

Netflix has been consistently hitting the air – strike after strike – in the past decade with a bad avalanche of productions and projects. The trend set by the streaming goliath of pandering to the masses for a season of a favored series before dumping it in the trash has picked up a lot of flak among the younger generation of viewers. Most of them make up the majority of the streamer’s subscribers and as such, the business-minded shrewdness that the juggernaut was once known for became a topic of much contentious debate.

Squid Game
Squid Game

Also read: Overseas Originals That Could Become the Next Squid Game

In an era plagued by tanking adaptations and horrible criticism (re: The Witcher saga), Netflix adapting an already successful show and turning it into a remake in the globally recognized English language sounds like a good plan. And Jeff Sneider along with John Rocha think so too. But the project adaptation will have its fair share of problems to face too if Netflix US does go through with it.

Why a US Squid Game by Netflix is a Bad Idea

Squid Game rumored to get a US remake
Squid Game rumored to get a US remake

Also read: Squid Game: 5 Things That Don’t Make Sense In The Show

For one, the socio-political and cultural components that made up the vast canon of Squid Game will be subjected to alteration to fit its new home in the US. The social commentary that was made heard in the series, alongside the significant shift in the way of life between the East and the West will become the first major point of contention in the US remake. South Korea’s Squid Game was essentially given voice and analogy because of the socio-economic adversity that haunted its people.

The US version, according to fans will also be subjected to the currently debated “woke” propaganda. Moreover, what Netflix subjected the globally beloved anime Death Note to with the Nat Wolff remake still scars the fandom to this day. If the same white-washing is applied to the US project, Netflix will lose a massive chunk of its viewership, mostly because of its bad investment. According to the netizens,

The Squid Game series had recently been adapted into a reality show with the same number of participants as the Netflix show and an equal amount of prize money to take home. Soon after its launch, news of injured participants being hospitalized due to exposure to extreme weather conditions during filming found its way onto the news. The Korean series, on the other hand, is doing spectacularly well and currently holds an incredible 95% Rotten Tomatoes rating.

Squid Game is now available for streaming on Netflix.

Source: The Hot Mic With Jeff and John

Written by Diya Majumdar

It's 2023 and Diya Majumdar's social life is defined by a 365-day binge-marathon of films and television shows. Having graduated with honors in literature from Miranda House, she now has more than 1000 published articles on Fandomwire, and her passion and profession both include dissecting the world of cinema. She happens to be a liberally opinionated person with an overbearing love for Monet, Edvard Munch, and Van Gogh, and hardly anything fascinates her more than painting exact replicas of all their troubled works – in oil, of course.