Patrick Stewart: One Marvel Star “Wouldn’t engage with any of us on a social level”, Made it Difficult to Communicate in $67M Star Trek Bomb

Patrick Stewart initially deemed his Star Trek costar an odd, solitary young man from London.

patrick stewart, star trek

SUMMARY

  • Outside of filming, Tom Hardy didn't engage in socializing with his Star Trek costars.
  • As a result, Patrick Stewart thought he might not have any future in Hollywood.
  • But as the story goes, Hardy went on to cement himself as one of the biggest names in acting.
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Tom Hardy loves to keep his social circle small, and during his initial years in Hollywood, he often didn’t engage in small talk with his fellow costars. This was reflected during his time in Star Trek: Nemesis, which remains his first and only appearance in the franchise, as Hardy would spend most of his time in his trailer when the cameras were off.

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As a result, his costar Patrick Stewart thought he might never hear of the Venom star again after Nemesis, as the actor hardly communicated with his costars on set.

Tom Hardy Hardly Communicated With His Star Trek Costars Outside of Filming

Tom Hardy and Patrick Stewart in Star Trek: Nemesis
A still from Star Trek: Nemesis | Paramount Pictures

Although Tom Hardy has no problem engaging in small talk when he needs to, the actor mostly prefers to be by himself. While there’s nothing wrong with it, this did become a problem for his costars on the set of Star Trek: Nemesis. Speaking of Hardy in his memoir, Patrick Stewart recalled that the actor wouldn’t engage with any one of them on a social level when the cameras weren’t rolling, and preferred spending that time “in his trailer with his girlfriend”.

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Stewart referred to the Venom star as “an odd, solitary young man from London”, and after he finally wrapped up filming and left the set, the X-Men star thought he might never hear of him again.

Tom Hardy
Tom Hardy in Star Trek: Nemesis | Paramount Pictures

He wrote:

[He] never said, ‘Good morning,’ never said, ‘Goodnight,’ and spent the hours he wasn’t needed on set in his trailer with his girlfriend. He was by no means hostile – it was just challenging to establish any rapport with him. On the evening [he] wrapped his role, he characteristically left without ceremony or niceties, simply walking out of the door. As it closed, I said quietly to [my co-stars], ‘And there goes someone I think we shall never hear of again.’

Even though Nemesis‘ box-office failure, which made only $67M from a budget of $60M, did halt Hardy’s rise to prominence for a while, the actor would eventually bounce back.

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Patrick Stewart Was Happy to Be Proven Wrong

Eight years after Nemesis‘ failure, Tom Hardy finally found his big break, thanks to Christopher Nolan’s Inception, and things only kept on ameliorating moving forward. The actor would then go on to star in several major franchises, including The Dark Knight Rises and Fury Road, and as of now, the Venom star has cemented himself as one of the biggest stars on the planet.

A still of Tom Hardy from SDCC
Tom Hardy. | Credit: Gage Skidmore/Wikimedia Commons.

Stewart, who couldn’t have been more wrong with his predictions, stressed that he was happy to be proven wrong by the actor.

It gives me nothing but pleasure that Tom has proven me so wrong.

With Venom 3 set to arrive this year, which will be the final chapter in the series, things are not looking to slow down for Hardy anytime soon.

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Venom: The Last Dance will hit theatres on 24 October 2024.

Star Trek: Nemesis is available to stream on Max.

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Written by Santanu Roy

Articles Published: 1576

Santanu Roy is a film enthusiast with a deep love for the medium of animation while also being obsessed with The Everly Brothers, Billy Joel, and The Platters. Having expertise in everything related to Batman, Santanu spends most of his time watching and learning films, with Martin Scorsese and Park Chan-wook being his personal favorites. Apart from pursuing a degree in animation, he also possesses a deep fondness for narrative-driven games and is currently a writer at Fandomwire with over 1500 articles.