Hidetaka Miyazaki Confirms Bloodborne and Sekiro’s Best Idea Was Taken From a PlayStation Classic That Everyone Wants to Make a Comeback

Miyazaki took inspiration and evolved it masterfully.

Hidetaka Miyazaki Confirms Bloodborne and Sekiro's Best Idea Was Taken From a PlayStation Classic That Everyone Wants to Make a Comeback

SUMMARY

  • Hidetaka Miyazaki took hints from a PlayStation classic to implement in his own games.
  • FromSoftware titles share plenty of elements with one another, especially the combat.
  • The Shinobi death blow in Sekiro and the visceral attacks in Bloodborne are quite similar.
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Games directed by Hidetaka Miyazaki have distinctive elements that make his work stand out from the rest of the competition. One of these aspects is the way the FromSoftware President approaches the combat in his titles, which often stays consistent with each subsequent release, giving a sense of uniformity to the games.

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But even the greatest ideas, like the ones implemented in Bloodborne and Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, are inspired by something that came long ago, and Miyazaki reveals which PlayStation classic was responsible for the inclusion of a fighting move in the aforementioned titles.

Hidetaka Miyazaki Reveals the Inspiration Behind Critical Combat Attacks

According to Hidetaka Miyazaki, critical attacks, like the visceral ones in Bloodborne, were inspired by a classic PlayStation series.
According to Hidetaka Miyazaki, critical attacks, like the visceral ones in Bloodborne, were inspired by a PlayStation series.

A couple of months before FromSoftware was set to launch Sekiro, Hidetaka Miyazaki was asked about the similarities that the critical attacks from his games share with one another, as the 2019 title also included a Shinobi death blow, which was reminiscent of moves from the studio’s older games. Originally introduced as backstab attacks in Dark Souls, the move took the form of visceral attacks in Bloodborne, leading to the critical attack in Sekiro.

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It’s not like we just love to do these critical attacks on everything,” answered Miyazaki, calling it “an evolution of the elements.”

Miyazaki continued by giving credit to a classic video game series that made its debut more than two decades ago, exclusively on the first PlayStation in 1998.

The death blow, the idea itself, is one of the things we got a hint of from Tenchu, from the original publications of that series.

The FromSoftware boss then proceeded to differentiate the death blows in Sekiro from the critical attacks in Bloodborne and Dark Souls, stating that the former “is something that can be initiated from stealth.”

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The Bloodborne Developer Has a Shared History With the Tenchu Games

FromSoftware has been the Japanese publisher for every game in the series after the third installment, including Tenchu Z.
FromSoftware has been the Japanese publisher for every game in the series after the third installment, including Tenchu Z.

Perhaps the most interesting aspect about Hidetaka Miyazaki‘s Tenchu inspiration is that FromSoftware became the Japanese publisher for every game in the series, starting with the third entry, which was released in 2006. The Bloodborne studio has also developed several Tenchu installments, including the Xbox 360-exclusive Shadow Assault.

It is a genuine shame that a series of games that inspired some of the greatest titles of modern times has not seen the light of day for nearly sixteen years, with no hopes of getting another installment.

Without the existence of Tenchu, who knows if Miyazaki would have been able to perfect the concept of critical attacks in his games, which he describes as “something that is a result of trying to find or trying to make a momentary weakness in your opponent.” The long-dead series may never come back to life, but its influence still remains strong.

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Which FromSoftware game has your favorite critical attack: Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, Bloodborne, or Dark Souls? Let us know in the comments!

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Written by Osama Farooq

Articles Published: 336

Extensively talking about everything pop culture is something Osama truly enjoys doing, so when it started to get a little annoying in person, he joined FandomWire and found a whole community to share his thoughts with. He consumes media in almost all forms, including linear story-based video games (The Last of Us), hip-hop/R&B music (The Weeknd), top-tier television (Better Call Saul), classic movies (Superbad), as well as reading books and watching anime.