“Miles Morales is not an original black character”: DC Fans Demand James Gunn Work on John Stewart, Mister Terrific to Fight Sony’s $375M Spider-Verse Franchise

“Miles Morales is not an original black character”: DC Fans Demand James Gunn Work on John Stewart, Mister Terrific to Fight Sony’s $375M Spider-Verse Franchise
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Whether Marvel or DC, characters that do not conform to society’s regulated standards have always achieved something exceptional. Such too is the case with artists, creators, and auteurs like James Gunn. Despite a spotty track record and a spectrum diagnosis, the filmmaker has bounced back into relevance, gained the trust of favor of his fans, and gone on to create stories and legacies for the audience to enjoy for decades to come.

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It is only right that the brilliant director and storyteller behind such productions as Guardians of the Galaxy, The Suicide Squad, and Peacemaker would be asked to lend his skills to create the most iconic in-house franchises at DC to fight the growing powerhouse of Sony’s rival IP: the Spider-Verse.

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James Gunn
James Gunn

Also read: “Why isn’t this guy running DC?”: $773M Marvel Movie Convinced David Zaslav James Gunn Needs to be DCU CEO

DC Fans Impore James Gunn To Rival Sony’s Spider-Verse

The unparalleled creations of James Gunn may be stunning in their individual narrative arcs but his skills are yet to be tested within the context of having to rival a superior and far more established franchise. Marvel’s frenemy, Sony has developed its own version of a universe with its host of Spider-Man IPs, including the titular web-slinger, and projects like Venom, Morbius, and the upcoming Madame Web. But none have been nearly as impressive as the animated multiversal epic, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. 

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Spider-Man: Across the Spider-Verse
Spider-Man: Across the Spider-Verse (2023)

Also read: Guillermo del Toro Calls Across the Spider-Verse a Turning Point in Animation: “Spider-Verse will mean a lot to the medium”

With visuals, music, plot, and characters to die for, Sony stole a decent chunk of die-hard MCU enthusiasts the day it released Into the Spider-Verse. The ensuing love that poured in for the newly discovered Miles Morales then gave rise to another concern: the lack of awareness about the history of Black characters that exist in the comic book lores of Marvel and DC.

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Now, as James Gunn sashays in to assume his role in the genesis of a new era at DC, fans implore the mastermind filmmaker to introduce a universe that rivals the one built by Sony’s Spider-Verse. Such a world would of course comprise iconic original Black superheroes like John Stewart, Mister Terrific, Crimson Avenger, and so on.

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While the fan-advocated idea may not be an entirely plausible one, it is far from impossible to create. The only hindrance in the execution of such a vastly planned in-house story might be caused by the establishment of the fledgling DCU narrative. With an entire arc planned out for the next 3-5 years at DC, James Gunn will have his hands full with creating a sustainable future for the CBM franchise – and if it is successful, a universe worthy enough to rival Sony’s Spider-Verse may not be too far in the making.

Relevance of Black Characters in the Popular Culture

John Stewart as Green Lantern
John Stewart as Green Lantern

Also read: Green Lantern Series: James Gunn Rumored to Have Hired Controversial DC Writer Tom King to Write the Show

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Of the manyfold characters in DC and Marvel throughout the history of these comic book franchises, superheroes have existed to bring a sense of candor, security, courage, and valor in times of need, and hope when all else seems lost. And for generations, we have found a version of ourselves when we look inside the glossy pages that hold the stories of characters from other worlds. 

Despite the distance that then separates the fictional realm of these heroes from this harsh and often dark reality of ours, we have learned from them, aspired to be them, and used their experiences as our own to find a place and an identity in this vast and listless world. As such, these graphic novels and comic books do not differentiate between class, gender, race, or religion. 

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The representation, which has relatively increased with the upswell waves of recent socio-cultural phenomena, has characters from every demography, from the farthest corners of the world, with identities that now challenge heteronormative and binary standards in the same way heroes would earlier challenge an unequal society’s status quo.

Miles Morales, John Stewart, Mister Terrific, Amanda Waller, Vixen, Cyborg, Black Lightning, Static, and Crimson Avenger are merely a faction of these new-age heroes. The revolution that they have given rise to, simply by their presence in the world of comics and animation alone, has given voice to a cause that needed recognition and acknowledgment within this new world order of ours.

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Written by Diya

With a degree in Literature from Miranda House, Diya Majumdar now has nearly 1500 published articles on FandomWire. Her passion and profession both include dissecting the world of cinema while being a liberally opinionated person with an overbearing love for Monet, Edvard Munch, and Van Gogh. Other skills include being the proud owner of an obsessive collection of Spotify playlists.