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6 Reasons Star Wars Shows Better Define The Franchise Now Than The Movies

Star Wars began with the movies in 1977 with A New Hope. More than half a century later, the franchise is now better defined by the Star Wars shows. Here’s why Star Wars shows are rocking it.

A Clear Gameplan

The Mandalorian

The sequel trilogy has had a very common point of criticism. Even you would agree on this. there’s a clear lack of coherence. Plot elements were introduced and then caution was thrown to the wind in the next set of films. Stuff was being done on the go as writers kept scrambling to make each end of the story meet. And it was ugly during multiple instances. That was not the case with Star Wars shows. Dave Filoni knew what he wanted the Star Wars: Rebels finale to boil down to. Each season of Rebels is a masterclass in storytelling. Then there’s The Mandalorian. The Gallery sequence that comes at the end of The Mandalorian shows Star wars shows begin with a clear picture in mind.

The Story Showed Both Sides Of The War

Clone Wars

Another criticism Star Wars fans frequently agree upon is how the movies just show one side of the coin. That factor only escalated once the Clone Wars series started airing. Clone Wars showcased galactic politics in ways not even the Prequel Trilogy could. “Heroes On Both Sides” show us the Separatists’ side of the story. It is only then do we realize that even they were being manipulated into doing someone else’s bidding. For the first time, Star wars shows gave us a whole new perspective.

Character Growth Of Established Villains

Darth Maul

Literally every villain the prequel trilogy introduced were done better in the Star Wars shows. Darth Maul for example, was turned into the greatest villain ever in Star Wars shows. He was brought back from death and turned into an even greater character. Emperor Palpatine was turned from a scheming fox to a force of nature in the shows. Count Dooku also got a fantastic character development arc. Even Tarkin and Darth Vader got story upgrades. The movies could not do as much as the Star wars shows did with the villains.

They Showed Us A Different Interpretation Of The Force

World Between Worlds

The Force, as a concept, was given only lip service in the movies. Sure the Jedi and the Sith use it in the films but we rarely do we see the films give us a better explanation of how it works. What we do get are superficial definitions and ideas. The World Between Worlds, Yoda’s Journey,the discovery of Bendu, and the Mortis arc show just how far and wide the implications of the Force are. The insights into the Force the Star wars shows give us are unmatched.

Highlighted The Tragedy Of Clone Individuality

Not Just Numbers

One thing the shows did a million times better was showcase the struggle of the Clone troopers. The movies only ended up showing them as numbers, nothing more than cannon fodder. It was in the  shows that we see them being humanized, struggling to find their place in the galaxy. The Bad Batch and storylines in other shows like the Fives’ conspiracy arc and the Rookies arc reveal how the Clones are going through internal struggles. We even got some incredible Clone characters like Rex and Gregor.

Star Wars Shows Dared To Experiment

Visions

The Mandalorian was a very nicely done show because it took elements from Star wars and then mixed it with other genres. We ended up getting a space opera based series with John Wick vibes. we loved every bit of it. The Book Of Boba Fett is not without its flaws but it still explored the criminal underworld of the galaxy in ways not even the movies have. Shows like Clone Wars and Star wars: Visions explored visual aesthetics in ways Star wars fans thought was not even possible.

Written by Bibhu Prasad Panda

With a Bachelor's in Engineering and a Master's in Marketing and Operations, Bibhu found a love for writing, working for many different websites. He joined FandomWire in July 2020 and worked his way to his current position of Content Strategist. Bibhu has been involved in operating and managing FandomWire's team of writers, diversifying into varied, exotic fields of pop culture.